The Golden Sands
of Yarki Island

If you want to enjoy Lake Baikal at its purest and best, then the northern half of Baikal is the place to go. It all starts with the fabled Olkhon Island and the Holy Nose Peninsula. But further north, if you really want to feel the force and majesty of our huge lake, then you might want to try and sail around one corner of the lake on one of our small boats. Any adventure lover would enjoy paddling on our canoes and kayaks, oars in hand, “….feeling the waves and the winds of Baikal with every fiber of your body….” (to quote a client from Ukraine who went with us on our trip onto Baikal).

To sign up, or to find out more about this trip, you can send an e-mail to rashit.yahin@usa.net

Or you can phone us at 7-301-302-1560.

 

Cost without Russian-language interpreter:

1 person 2 persons 3-4 persons 5-8 persons 9-11 persons
51 Euros 36 Euros each 24 Euros each 18 Euros each 15 Euros each

Cost for international tourists who would like to be accompanied by a Russian interpreter:

1 person 2 persons 3 persons 4-5 persons 6-7 persons 8-10 persons
94 Euros 57 Euros each 45 Euros each 34 Euros each 26 Euros each 22 Euros each

What we include in the price of this trip: rental of our kayaks/canoes, use of our life-jackets, full picnic lunch, and full services of our guide/instructor.
This full-day trip is for people who truly like to be active and enjoy the great outdoors.
 

Description of this trip

You may not know this, but the shorelines of northern Baikal actually lie off-shore! You see, there is a narrow crescent of sand that forms a barrier island of sorts, about 15 kilometers (10 miles) long, and 20-200 meters (70-700 feet) wide. This is the famous Yarki Island, certainly one of most attractive destinations in the northern lake area. This is also the favourite area for our Olga Tsybina, who helps arrange our tours.

Yarki Island is a place that is untouched by development. There are no resorts here, no night-clubs, no cafes even. 

Our boating trip onto Baikal starts as we push out our kayaks and canoes from the docks at Nizhneangarsk. It’s about 4.5 kilometers (less than 3 miles) to get to Yarki Island from here. Of course, if the weather is choppy, then we can easily start off from the mouth of the Kichera River, which is sheltered by Yarki Island. From there it’s very close to the island; either way, our trip will run whatever the weather.

As we paddle along the sandy shores of Yarki, we will head on out of the island’s lee into the wide-open lake (weather permitting, of course). At any point while on Baikal, if the wind starts whipping up, we can easily come to shore and portage the boats across the narrow island, and put it again on the other, more protected side. After all, the island itself acts as a fine barrier against the larger waves of Baikal.

Once on Yarki itself, we will hang out on the sandy beaches, have a picnic lunch by the campfire (you can try our tasty Baikal fish, grilled over the fire and served with aromatic tea). The swimming here is great, since the water often gets up to 25 degrees Celsius (which is about 77 degrees Fahrenheit). 

Please note that we have canoes and other small craft that you can use to reach any part of the island. When we leave the island, we will sail over to the mouth of the river Kichera, where the sand dunes are all covered by creeping cedar bush. After this, you can return to your starting point and go full circle on our trip.

To sign up, or to find out more about this trip, you can send an e-mail to rashit.yahin@usa.net

Or you can phone us at 7-301-302-1560.

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